A MULTI-COLOURED PAINTING WITH MUSICAL UNDERTONES

Never feel sad again when you’ve got this painting to look at.
Bright, uplifting colours and clean, yet interesting lines make this artwork a real hoot.

black sofa

I’ve always been interested by sounds. How they move, how they change and the colours I imagine them as. Different tones and pitches trigger different colours in my mind, so listening to music (for me) is a very colourful place.

Music always influences me as I paint but I have never, until now, let it be the thing that controls it. The albums of a particular band played throughout the creation of this painting and what has resulted from that is a happy and uplifting piece of art that reminds me not of the band and their music but also of the dancing patterns of sound waves full stop.

The purpose here was to let myself dwell on what the music did to me and how I imagined it to look like if it were born of shape and form. Look closer and you’ll see bold colours (crescendo’s and anthems) as well as more subtle tonal shades (lightness and thoughtful composition).

I also have a little bit of crazy, some darkness, linear lines, up and down movement and a noticeable absence of curves and circles. There is deliberate repetition, nothing too heavy, distinctive progression, clarity, calm, thoughtfulness and balance.

The ultimate reward is modern art original that will fill any space with one giant, unapologetic smack of colour. Painted with nothing more than stillness, calm and a the entire CD collection of one of the greatest bands of all time.

Dear Santa… What I really want for Christmas is…

The art of Gerhard Richter has always been an influence for me from time to time. One of the techniques I used is similar to his apply and remove one that removes single layers of paint leaving a small amount left. The ability to build colour using these dragged layers is at the base of how I created this painting.

Layer on, layer off and so on and so on. This is the secret behind how I get the lustre of the paints and the depth of colour.